Check It Out: New Grant Opportunity!

Foundation Grants from the Lumina Foundation for Education- Giving on a national basis. The foundation's primary goal is to raise the proportion of the U.S. adult population who earn college degrees to 60 percent by 2025. The foundation is dedicated to expanding access and success in education beyond high school. While their mission focuses on both student access and success in higher education, the foundation's emphasis is on attainment, defined as completing post-secondary certificates, associate and baccalaureate degrees and credentials. States: All States

Average Amount: $1,000.00 - $500,000.00

Total Amount: $30,000,000.00 - $60,000,000.00

Address: PO Box 1806, Indianapolis, IN 46206-1806

Telephone: 317-951-5300

E-mail: newinquiry@luminafoundation.org

Website: The Lumina Foundation

Eligibility: Higher Education, Other

Program Areas: Adult Literacy, Arts, Early Childhood, General Education, Health/PE, Library, Math, Reading, Science/Environmental, Social Studies, Special Education, STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math), Vocational

Deadline: Ongoing

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 Educational Grants from the Mockingbird Foundation- Grants given to support K-12 music education on a national basis. Education may include the provision of instruments, texts, and office materials, and the support of learning space, practice space, performance space, and instructors/instruction. Mockingbird is particularly interested in projects that foster self-esteem and free expression. The Foundation is interested in targeting children 18 years or younger, but will consider projects which benefit college students, teachers, instructors, or adult students.

States: All States

Average Amount: $100.00 - $5,000.00

E-mail: grants@mbird.org

Website: The Mockingbird Foundation

Eligibility: Public School, Private School, Other

Program Areas: Arts, At-Risk/Character

Deadline: 8/1/2014

The Dark Side of Grant Writing

by Neva Fenno, M.S.Ed., MLIS clock

Happy New Year, gentle reader! My resolution for this blog is to keep it fresh and very useful for fledgling grant writers in schools everywhere.

This article is part of a series of articles about grant writing for teachers and school personnel. I've been outlining steps to take in the process, and have provided you with some templates for your narratives, and a budget planning Excel document that will help you make sure you cover all the financial bases. This blog is part of a super Grants Database you can search for appropriate resources.

You've decided that grant writing is for you, the discipline required to meet deadlines is in your genetic code, you love the social nature of making relationships with the power brokers in your community, and you love the adulation you receive from the other teachers in your community. This is the pretty picture; most of you who have done this for a while know that there is a dark side to the grants world. We'll talk a little bit about that today.

We'll say you now have a couple of successful grant applications under your belt, you've made inroads in your community for developing a steady stream of funding from several sources, things are really going well. You were not, however, prepared for the enormous amount of time all of these activities have taken from your schedule. Your husband/wife is now permanently angry with you all the time for missing all those soccer matches that little Poindexter has played. The bags under your eyes are deeper than the Grand Canyon, and the laundry is about a week overdue.

Don't despair, you will find ways to manage your time so that all can be accomplished, and you will even be graceful doing it. One of the keys is to delegate. Some sections of a grant narrative can be done by people who are eager to help. In an earlier blog I cautioned against writing grants in committee, it rarely produces a coherent application. However, to delegate some of the demographics paragraphs and maybe budget research is acceptable. You've made a list of the costs you will incur in your project, but someone else can help you get the three bids you're going to need to find the lowest costs. This one is sort of fun, you get to work with vendors and learn to sweet talk them to a fair price. Don't kid yourself, it is always negotiable. Someone accused me of being unfair to corporate America for doing this, come on now folks, think about that for a minute.

Another cast member in the dark side of the grant writing drama is the whiner. There's a teacher in your building who snipes at you behind your back, suggesting that you don't know what you are doing, and that your motives are impure. This person is making a career of trashing your work, and it isn't fun. My solution to this one is to sit down with the whiner to try to find out what the real issues are. Chances are its jealousy; they want some of this limelight you are now basking in. A good solution to this is to find something for the whiner to do. Bring him into the fold, and then be sure to give him lots of credit for being helpful along the way. Amazing how fast the whining will stop.

There are other parts to the dark side, the fact that now that you've been successful, people expect this level of success on a regular basis. I can tell you from experience, there will be dry spells along the way, you will develop writer's block on occasion, and life will intervene to take you away from the tasks of putting together an application. You are not a superhero, you do what you can, and it’s all you can do anyway.

So, grant writer that you are, suck up to the dark side, learn to embrace it, and continue on your path to glory.

It's all for the kids anyway, right?

Please comment on this post, let me know if there are topics you'd like me to cover. I have a million stories to tell, seven years as a grants manager has taught me a few things and I'd love to share it all with you.

Check It Out: New Grant Opportunity!

Foundation Grants from the Easton Sports Development Foundation II- the goal of The Easton Sports Development Foundation is to promote the sport of archery and/or bow hunting and continue these efforts through college and university programs. We want to be a catalyst in the development of archery as a mainstream sport and help it to grow at the state, regional, and national level. Requests for less than $25,000.00 can be submitted at any time.

States: All States

Average Amount: $1,000.00 - $50,000.00

Total Amount: $1,000,000.00 – 5,000,000.00

Address: 7855 Haskell Avenue, Suite 360, Van Nuys, CA 91406

Telephone: 818-909-2207 Ext. 306

E-mail: ibriones@esdf.org

Website: Easton Sports Development Foundation II

Eligibility: Public School, Private School, Higher Education, Other

Program Areas: Health/PE

Deadline: 3/1/2014

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Computing Education for the 21st Century from the National Science Foundation- the Computing Education for the 21st Century (CE21) program aims to build a robust computing research community, a computationally competent 21st century workforce, and a computationally empowered citizenry. In this undertaking, there are three interrelated challenges: the significant underproduction of degrees needed for the computing and computing-related workforce, the longstanding underrepresentation of many segments of our population, and the lack of a presence of computing in K-12. CE21 thus supports efforts in three tracks: Computing Education Research, CS 10K, and Broadening Participation.

States: All States

Average Amount: $600,000.00 - $1,000,000.00

Total Amount: $15,000,000.00

Address: 4201 Wilson Blvd. Arlington, VA 22230

Telephone: 703-292-8900

E-mail: jcuny@nsf.gov

Website: National Science Foundation

Eligibility: Public School, Higher Education, Other

Program Areas: General Education, Technology

Deadline: 3/12/2014

Training for Grant Writers

by Neva Fenno, M.S.Ed., MLIS

steno and pen

This article is part of a series of articles about grant writing for teachers and school personnel. I've been outlining steps to take in the process, and provided you with some templates for your narratives, and a budget planning Excel document that will help you make sure you cover all the financial bases. This blog is part of a super Grants Database, you can search for appropriate resources.

If you have been selected to be "the school grant writer", it's probably because you raised your hand in a faculty meeting when the subject of fund raising came up. You have a reputation for being organized, detail oriented, and timeline friendly. These are all great traits, but the process of getting a grant can sometimes be a “be careful what you wish for” situation. Working through the writing process will take weeks, perhaps months if you are doing it right.

Sounds daunting, but once you have a few grant applications (successful ones) under your belt, subsequent applications will become easier. You have an opportunity to become a hero in your school, and if you are really good at it, develop a career in grantsmanship.

Assuming you are in this now for the long haul, it may have occurred to you that there might be some formal training available that can help you become an effective grant writer. I've outlined a few of the possibilities (free and not so free) for formal training in this blog.

  • Full-fledged master's degree program in grants management:

Concordia - online and distance education solution.

  • Grant Writing USA, organized workshops throughout the country, a formulaic approach to learning how to write and manage grants (not for everyone, but useful nonetheless.)
  • Foundation Center - one of the oldest and most established organizations for grant writing professionals - worth a look-see. If nothing else, network with other professionals.
  • YouTube presentation - are you visual? YouTube has many videos on the process of writing a grant. We link to one here (disclosure - this video was selected randomly with no allegiance to any commercial products it may highlight.)
  • A librarian's approach, always a good place to start.
  • Slideshare presentation - if you aren't familiar with Slideshare, take a look at the resources available on this site.
  • LinkedIn - Grant professional’s corner - meet and network with fellow grant writers, they are always available to help you through sticky parts of the process.

So many resources and great training opportunities, so little time. All you have to do is Google (or Bing, or Yahoo) "grant writing training". You will be astonished at what pops up.

Let me know what you think about formal training! Maybe you are more organic and learn best by doing - let me know your training selections.

Check It Out: New Grant Opportunity!

Ford Foundation Educational Grants from The Ford Foundation- The foundations grant making focuses on reducing poverty and injustice; promoting democratic values; and advancing human knowledge, creativity and achievement. Types of grants the foundation makes: General/core support, Project, Planning, Competition, Matching, Recoverable, Individual, Endowment, Foundation-administered project, and Program-related investment.

States: All States

Total Amount: $450,000,000.00 - $480,000,000.00

Average Amount: $100,000.00 - $500,000.00

Address: 320 East 43rd Street, New York, NY 10017-4801

Telephone: 212-573-5000

E-mail: office-secretary@fordfound.org

Website: The Ford Foundation

Eligibility: Public School, Private School, Higher Education, Other

Program Areas: After-School, Arts, At-Risk/Character, Community Involvement/Volunteerism, Early Childhood, Family Services, General Education, Health/PE, Math, Reading, Science/Environmental, Social Studies, STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math), Technology

Deadline: Ongoing

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EngineerGirl Essay Contest from Lockheed Martin- In honor of the NAE’s 50th anniversary, we invite you to imagine how engineering might change our lives over the next 50 years, in one of the following areas: Nutrition, Health, Communication, Education, or Transportation. Guidelines for length are: Grades 3–5: about 400 to 500 words; Grades 6–8: about 600 to 800 words; and Grades 9–12: about 1100 to 1500 words.

States: All States

Average Amount: $100.00 - $500.00

Address: National Academy of Engineering 500 Fifth St. NW Rm. 1047 Washington, DC 20001

E-mail: EngineerGirl@nae.edu

Website: Engineer Girl

Eligibility: Public School, Private School

Program Areas: General Education, Science/Environmental, STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)

Deadline: 3/1/2014

Grant Writing - Your New Career?

by Neva Fenno, M.S.Ed., MLIS pen writing

You are well on your way to finishing your narrative for your grant application to XYZ Foundation. I've been concentrating on the technical aspects of grant writing so you'll have a template, outline and budget planner to use for any grant application process. Just in time for the holidays, let's step back and scratch the itch I know you've been developing. What's is like to write grants for a living?

First, I need to help you distinguish between grant writing and grants management. If you're getting really good at this, and enjoy the process (deadlines and stress included), you may want to explore the wonderful world of a career in grantsmanship. If you are the go-to grants person in your school, you are a grant writer. Your school district most likely has a business manager (many are deputy superintendents) who takes the proceeds of successful grant applications and manages the cash flow and expenditure of those funds. If you haven't done this yet, make an appointment to sit down with the district business manager to explain your progress and interest in working with him/her to make this process smooth and professional.

If this relationship is already perking along, and you are comfortable with your role and the lines around which you actually experience the money, you'll also want to make sure your principal is aware of your desires and professional management skills. Your district superintendent will want to be in on these discussions, leaving any one of those people out of your conversation is very bad practice, and your new career will end quickly.

I began my career as a teacher and library media specialist who wanted to bring in some funds to improve my school/s. Sound familiar? Believe me, it is intoxicating when the approval letters start to arrive, and checks are cut. Be sure your foundation managers know to whom they will be sending the funds, and how the checks should be endorsed and deposited. Most likely, you will never see the check, unless it's a small local grant from a merchant in town who has heard of your project. It is critical that these checks are handled correctly and handed over promptly to the appropriate parties. Make copies of everything, put your paperwork in a binder, and keep it secure. Create a duplicate binder for your business manager and update it for her frequently. Hand deliver checks or send via certified mail.

Pretty soon in my grant writing career, I knew I wanted to do this again, and again, and ..... I had no idea where to take this new found ambition. You have now entered the spooky world of school district politics. The way you approach this, and the manner in which you communicate your intentions is very important. Transparency rocks!

I knew I wanted to broaden my education, so I went back to school to finish a master's degree in educational administration. Good education junkie that I am, this degree program was heady and full of promise, and I happily completed it for many reasons having nothing to do with grants. The possibilities are endless for advancement in public (or private) education. School districts need great leaders. Keep in mind your school year will lengthen, summer vacations will vanish, and your colleagues will look at you in a whole new light. Don't get bogged down by faculty room nattering about "those idiots downtown" even if you've jumped right in to those conversations in the past. If your plans pan out, you're about to become an idiot.

My first administrative job in a large urban district was in the curriculum office. This was ideal for me, coming from special education and library media, I could now broaden my outlook to curriculum k-12, a great vantage from which to view the needs of your learning community. If you remember you are creating with standards as your guide (Common Core State Standards), and all subjects as your palette, you can start painting pictures that illustrate the road to the improvement of academic achievement for your students. Remember, it's not about the money; it's really about children and their path to learning. You can become well rounded in the curriculum office, or as a principal.

Then as time went by and a position opened up in the grants office, I saw the opportunity and went to work. My responsibilities were for acquiring and managing state, federal, private and corporate grant resources for schools. There were times when I felt I was ill-suited for the job, bean counting and attention to meticulous detail were really not my forte, but I had a great staff of accounting clerks to help me keep it all straight.

I had big wipe off calendars on the wall to keep me on track, and with help from some professionals in the field, it has become a great career. I have now moved on to consulting, blogging and grant making, another avenue with promising career possibilities. For your perusal, I present you with some organizations that may help you decide if this is for you, and help you scratch your itch:

Networking: LinkedIn, Grant Manager Profiles

Education and Training: Lists of degree programs. Professional OrganizationsHow-to sites. and Blogs.

You'll work long hours, have stressful days, and think you've lost your mind on several occasions, but you will join a group of professionals who are in it for the kids in a very big way. If it's not about the kids, you're in it for the wrong reason.

Let me know what you think!

Check It Out: New Grant Opportunity!

Mini-Grants from the Music Is Revolution Foundation - The Music Is Revolution Foundation administers a mini-grant program for Music Is Revolution activities designed by teachers to implement, support, and/or improve their ability to provide quality music education for their students. Only projects that clearly contain a music education focus, projects based on the concept of music education, through musical experiences, initiating students into a sense of their social, academic, and cultural identity, and humanizing them through the emotional, cognitive, and/or physical impact of music will be considered. States: All States

Average Amount: $500.00

Address: PO Box 11899 Portland, OR 97211

E-mail: grants@musicisrevolution.com

Website: Music Is Revolution Foundation

Eligibility: Public School

Program Areas: Arts

Deadline: 1/15/2014

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Educational Grants from the Edward E. Ford Foundation - Giving limited to the U.S. and its protectorates; providing grants for independent secondary education only. Independent secondary schools must hold full and active membership in National Association of Independent Schools to be eligible for consideration. No grants to individuals, or for emergency funds or deficit financing and no support for public elementary or college-level schools, schools that have been applicants within the last three years, or schools that do not have individual membership in NAIS (National Association of Independent Schools).

States: All States

Total Amount: $2,727,000.00

Average Amount: $50,000.00

Address: 66 Pearl St., Ste. 322, Portland, ME 04101-4165

Telephone: 207-774-2346

E-mail: office@eeford.org

Website: Edward E. Ford Foundation

Eligibility: Private School

Program Areas: General Education, Math, Reading, Science/Environmental, Social Studies, STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)

Deadline: 3/1/2014

Midterm Grant Narrative Review

by Neva Fenno, M.S.Ed., MLIS money on a clothes line

You are well on your way to finishing your narrative for your grant application to XYZ Foundation. You now understand why the dollar amount you are requesting was a big question mark when you started this process; it needed to be revealed along the way, as part of the process. If you started your grant writing project with "We're going to need and write for $10,000.00 you know you started from the wrong place in the process."

A caveat is probably due from the author at this point. The processes and tips I provide are what have worked for me. I am a veteran grant writer and manager, I've raised millions of dollars for schools and over time, I've developed a rhythm of what needs to happen when. You may find a better way, one that works best for you, but some of the words of wisdom I provide will save you a great deal of time and get you off on the right foot.

The three big caveats are:

1. You are not writing a grant to get money for your school, you are creating an appeal to a foundation to join with you in a partnership that will solve a problem and help improve academic achievement in your school.

2. When you start to write the narrative, you have only a very vague idea of how much money you are requesting, that is being revealed as you go along and identify research based ways to solve your problem.

3. The relationship you develop with the foundation or corporation you have identified from your research through the Grants Database will be a long-term partnership. Once you have a grant from this organization, the door is open for future support. They will become your benefactor in many ways. You may find that corporations will want their employees to volunteer in your school to get real-world experience and become partners in the education of children in their community.

4. A bonus fourth caveat is that you may need to write several grants to different funding organizations to cover all the costs of your project. This happens all the time. You'll get to know what each supporter will and won't pay for. There's always another who will step up and pay for that last little piece of the puzzle.

I've provided you with a budget planner spreadsheet. It is a great idea to stop now and take a closer look at it. You may want to add to it, print it out, and keep it handy so you can be sure you are not forgetting any details for providing for your needs. Please print it out right now, and let's look at some of the line items (now you'll know what people mean when they talk about things like line items.).

You'll want to give every grant application a number. On the budget planner you'll see a place for "ORG". That's the internal number you will use to identify the grants you pursue and keep them all organized. You will want to start creating and identifying numbering systems. A combination letter and number code has always worked for me. A state grant might begin with S1 - your first state grant might be S1 and so forth. You might want to add a date, call it S1111513 (first state grant submitted on 11/15/2013).

You'll find lines for salaries, this will include part and full time staffs you will need to carry out your plan. Your principal might want to cover part of a teacher's salary with funds from the grant. This amount will fall under "instructional salary." A stipend is usually an hourly rate for staff you will hire part time. You want to keep administrative, instructional, clerical and paraprofessional salaries separate. If you're paying for part of a teacher's salary, you'll want to be sure to cover their fringe benefits (how much will you need to subsidize their health insurance for example).

Contractual stands for companies or consultants you will bring in to provide services that support the project. Start thinking now about drawing up an actual contract with your service providers (more about this later in the series). Everyone is happier when things are carefully spelled out and all parties have signed an agreement. There is no such thing as a casual relationship when money is involved.

Your supply lines need to be specific. Grantors will want to know the percentages of your budget that you are setting aside for different items. You will want to work with your foundation representative to see if they have limits on lines. They may only be willing to support a salary at 10% for instance. Or computer software and supplies can only represent 15% of the total request. They will help you with the budget, take advantage of their expertise. In the beginning of my grant writing career I was intimidated by the budget, but quickly learned that the foundation was very eager to help with the details. They want you to succeed. Private grants (foundations and corporations) are competitive but that doesn't necessarily mean "impossible to get". If, by the time they score your application with their scoring rubric, you have been on the phone with them to work through details; they know about your needs and have a name and face to go with the application. You will be that much more ahead of the curve.

You'll want to be sure you are supplementing not supplanting. The grant funds you seek will support the materials and supplies your city is paying for, not taking the place of, or becoming the sole source for materials that should be covered by your local budget.

Yes, it's complicated; it's a great deal of information to absorb all at once. That's why this blog is crafted in a logical progression, to describe bits and pieces. It's all intended to help you become a confident and successful grant writer.

Please feel free to comment on this blog and provide ideas and suggestions. I value your insights.

Developing the Budget from Your Narrative

by Neva Fenno, M.S.Ed., MLIS You are well on your way to finishing your narrative for your grant application to XYZ Foundation. You've crafted a most persuasive argument, using data and demographics from reliable sources; your need has been thoroughly explained and documented. You've developed a tone and voice that is professional, but compelling.

pen writing

As you've moved on to the next item on the narrative section list, "Activities", you are confronted with the dreaded methodology. OK, we get it, you need your kids to improve their reading scores, an afterschool program is missing from your repertoire of solutions to the problem. It is a demonstrated and research-based method for solving your particular problem. You just don't have the stuff or the staff you need to pull it off.

In focus groups with stakeholders, you've determined that there are some really great supplementary materials, software and Internet resources that are available with your reading curriculum from ABC Reading Company. You need more books, some have become torn or have gotten lost, you want to add a couple of lower and higher level readers to what you have. There are workbooks available in e-book and paper formats that would help fill out what you already own. You want to add some supporting fiction to your library media center, online resources, videos and audio support perhaps. Your district only purchased the bare bones set for all the classrooms it serves. All of your teachers have been trained to use this curriculum so you don't necessarily want to throw out the baby with the bath water.

You've reached the point in your narrative that begins to justify your budget request. At this stage you really don't know how much you will be asking for. The dollar amount will emerge as you go along. Don't worry about whether or not the foundation will provide all the money you need. If necessary, your appeal can be spread among several funding resources. Right now, you just want to be sure you analyze your needs carefully and that you include every possible item needed in your budget.

Here is a "budget planning sheet" you may find useful. It has been my guide for years. It is a list of all the funding categories you might possibly need to be sure you include all required items for your project. It forces you to think of everything. It is an Excel spreadsheet and it automatically adds everything up so you can keep track of what your budget request will be when you finally submit your application.

This document differs from the budget document the foundation will want you to use when you submit. It is your internal guide. You can write all over it, add and take away lines, and print it out for others to review. Someone else in your group may think of something you've left out. There's nothing worse than finishing your application and having someone point out that you forgot the software that links the curriculum to smart board exercises for phonics (for instance).

If you started your grant-writing exercises with a firm dollar amount in mind, you will be surprised by how much it has changed now that you've really taken the program apart. Your activities section might be structured as a timeline, you have a twenty-week afterschool program planned, and you have lesson plans sketched out for how you want each of those twenty week sessions to build on the last. There are visits to the library, a field trip or two, and oh yes, don't forget stipends for your teachers. Unless you have a very unusual climate and culture in your district, these folks will expect to be paid. You may need an administrator on hand to be sure you stick to the script. You'll need office supplies, do you want to have a clerk available in the office to meet and greet parents at the end of each afterschool session? Do you need an assessment specialist to help you build out your measurement instruments for the program? Your grantor is going to want to know if your program meets their expectations (and yours) for success.

Don't forget to add one or two post-program sessions for staff to have everyone meet and decide how the program succeeded, failed, or should be repeated next year. So much to think about, but your budget planning sheet will help you with all of it.

I know, I know, you started reading this blog because you want to write a grant. You don't want to be a number cruncher or a technology nerd. And you're a teacher, not Ernest Hemingway. Welcome to the wonderful world of grant writing and grants management. At the end of the day, no one else will do it for you. It's definitely a "be careful what you wish for" proposition. However, I am alive and here to tell you, it's all worthwhile. You will be stretched and all the accumulated skills and talents of a lifetime will be called into play.

Please feel free to comment on this blog and provide ideas and suggestions. I learn from teachers each and every day.

Check It Out: New Grant Opportunity!

Dreyfus Foundation Educational Grants from The Max and Victoria Dreyfus Foundation, Inc.-  Giving on a national basis to support museums, cultural, and performing arts programs; schools, hospitals, educational and skills training programs, programs for youth, seniors, and the handicapped; environmental and wildlife protection activities; and other community-based organizations and their programs. Organizations seeking support from the foundation may submit a letter of request, not exceeding three pages in length, which includes a brief description of the purpose of the organization, and a brief outline of the program or project for which funding is sought. States: All States

Total Amount: $2,800,000.00 - $4,000,000.00

Average Amount: $1,000.00 - $20,000.00

Address: 2233 Wisconsin Avenue N.W., Suite 414, Washington, DC 20007

Telephone: 202-337-3300

E-mail: info@mvdreyfusfoundation.org

Website: Max and Victoria Dreyfus Foundation

Eligibility: Public School, Private School, Higher Education, Other

Program Areas: Afterschool, Arts, At-Risk/Character, Disabilities, General Education, Health/PE, Math, Reading, Science/Environmental, Social Studies, Special Education, STEM ( Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)

Next Deadline: 11/10/2013

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Classroom Grants the Association of American Educators- Classroom grants can be used for a variety of projects and materials, including but not limited to books, software, calculators, math manipulatives, art supplies, audio-visual equipment, and lab materials. Classroom grants are available to all educators.

States: All States

Average Amount: $500.00

Address: 27405 Puerta Real, Suite 230, Mission Viejo, California 92691

Telephone: 877-385-6264

E-mail: awards@aaeteachers.org

Website: Association of American Educators

Eligibility: Public School, Private School

Program Areas: Arts, General Education, Math, Reading, Science/Environmental, Social Studies, Technology

Next Deadline: 3/1/2014

Tone and Voice in Grant Narrative

by Neva Fenno, M.S.Ed., MLIS

steno and pen

Writer's block is a common problem among grant writers. You work hard to collect useful and relevant information for your narrative, create an outline, get organized, and try to figure out what to cut or leave in a narrative paragraph so it passes word count or page restrictions put in place by the grantor.

It never fails! I get to the point of taking the narrative outline and filling it out to make a pleasing and convincing narrative for the grant readers to evaluate and I freeze. The stakes are high, you want this application to be successful, you know you have competition coming from grant writing professionals from disparate organizations, schools, and social service agencies.

You know you are eligible because you've checked with the foundation to make sure it provides funds to public schools (or whatever entity you are writing for). You can't stall any longer. So, you start to write.

Often, what comes out, at least at first, is a stiff, formal recitation of facts: your test and demographic data to support your need, a list of activities you will pursue to solve the problem, your goals and objectives, and data to support your assessment strategy.

On your first read through a common reaction to your own writing is "Ughrrrgh, that's just awful". Your spelling of "ughrrrgh" will vary depending on your general feelings of self-worth, but it's always the same. It's ok, it's supposed to be awful at this stage, you will write and rewrite many times before you submit your application. It's one of the reasons you have assembled your stakeholders in the first place. They will act as proofreaders and provide commentary when the tortuous task of writing is complete. Thank goodness you have friends!

One tip to hold on to: Every foundation, corporation, or government agency that provides grants has grant readers. These folks are experienced; they've been reading grant applications for a long time. They know what the foundation is trying to achieve by the careful application of funds in the community. In the first round of reading applications, they may read hundreds of narratives. You want your application to stand out, be readable and be persuasive. You may draw the line at entertaining, but an injection of humor is not out of the question, especially if you've met the readers and have a standing relationship with the organization. An excellent, thorough article on grant writing style can be found at the Purdue University OWL (Online Writing Lab) site.

Whatever you do, keep your voice professional. These readers wade through some of the most egregious assaults on the English language you have ever seen. I know this because I have been a reader for a number of private foundations. You would not believe the misspelled, grammatically sinful drivel people submit. Keep your voice professional, your tone serious (but not deadening) and above all, your grammar and spelling impeccable. If you have added footnotes (this is often a good idea if you are providing a review of research literature), use MLA (Modern Language Association) or APA (American Psychological Association) rules of style.

To remind yourself of the best writing you have done, go through old college papers, select the ones that garnered an A, and see for yourself. You're pretty good at this, but you just need encouragement and support. Your goal is to persuade, so a review of guidelines for persuasive essays might help.

Another tip, when you've finished your first draft, go back and eliminate redundancies, shorten your sentences (more like Hemingway than Faulkner). Save your long, winding, lyrical prose for the great American novel you know will write one day.

Tips and tricks for a great grant narrative:

  • Be kind to the beloved grant reader.
  • Keep your sentences short.
  • Use a professional tone and voice.
  • Perform positive, self-affirming exercises in the mirror each day.
  • Support your application with strong demographic information.
  • Used an organized approach (outline, footnotes).
  • Avoid the "aaarrrggghhh" by taking breaks and deep breaths.

Remember, you may fail the first time around, but you WILL get better at this.

If you fail the first time, be sure to contact the grantor and ask for an evaluation rubric so you can find out why your attempt wasn't successful. They will be helpful and will share their thoughts freely. They want you to succeed; a good strong application narrative helps them see the beauty of your argument and your solution to the problem you face in your school.

Check It Out: New Grant Opportunity!

BOKS Activation Grant from the Reebok Foundation- Reebok and the Reebok Foundation are awarding $1,000 to up to 500 schools for the 2013/2014 school year! The grants are intended to help get kids moving in a fun way to wake up their bodies for a day of learning with BOKS (Build Our Kids' Success), a before-school physical activity program. School staff, parents, and other community members are all invited to apply for the BOKS Activation Grant to support the launch of BOKS in their elementary schools. Applications will be accepted on a rolling first come, first serve basis through December, 2013. All elementary schools, public or private, across the country can apply. The BOKS Activation Grant is only for new BOKS schools. Schools that already run the BOKS program are not eligible to apply. States: All States      

Total Amount: $500,000.00

Average Amount: $1,000.00

Address: 1895 J.W. Foster Blvd, Canton, MA 02021

Telephone: 781-401-7986

E-mail: grants@bokskids.org

Website: http://www.bokskids.org/2013/09/1000-boks-activation-grant/

Eligibility: Public School, Private School

Program Areas: Health/PE

Deadline: 12/31/2013

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Nurturing Children Grants from the New York Life Foundation- The “Nurturing the Children” initiative has centered on two key issues: educational enhancement and childhood bereavement programs. The Foundation funds programs that enhance and augment classroom instruction during the critical out-of-school (after-school and summer) hours. The Foundation supports programs that help prepare young people for higher education and the workplace and equip them to be responsible citizens. The Foundation has also expanded their focus to include an initiative to help children deal with the loss of a parent, caregiver or sibling and to help parents and other caring adults help children deal with the emotional turmoil that results from the death of a close family member.

States: All States

Total Amount: $4,500,000.00 - $16,500,000.00

Average Amount: $1,000.00 - $100,000.00

Address: 51 Madison Avenue, Suite 352, New York, NY  10010

Telephone: 212-576-3466

E-mail: nylfoundation@newyorklife.com

Website: http://www.newyorklife.com/foundation

Eligibility: Private School, Other     

Program Areas: After-School, At-Risk/Character, Early Childhood, Family Services, General Education, Health/PE, Safe/Drug Free Schools

Deadline: Ongoing

Organize Next Steps

by Neva Fenno, M.S.Ed., MLIS white board

I highly recommend getting a dry erase white board. A big one so you can create a timeline for the development and completion of your grant project. Writing a grant is not about creating a document on a deadline. It's about a project, with many moving parts. You will be distracted by other things, like life. Getting organized is easier for some than others. In my life it has been a real struggle. I'm the one seen running down the hall in my platforms, papers flying, screeching "OMG, I'm late." There goes Neva again.

There are helpful software programs that can guide you through organization phases. I like something called "Simplicity", its name speaks volumes, it has a very small learning curve and creates nice visual organization tools you can use to manage yourself, and to communicate timelines to grantors.

Organize/structure the proposal.  I shared this outline last time, it bears repeating. This is just one look at a way to organize the information you want to share with your potential grantors. They will have strong opinions about how they want this to look also.

  • Abstract (consider writing your abstract last; it will allow for more concise, project specific information)
  • Problem Statement or Significance of Project
  • Project Purpose (overall goal and specific objectives)
  • Research Design or work plan (activities and timelines)
  • Applicant qualifications and capabilities
  • Evaluation Plan - assessments
  • Budget (summary and justifications - refer back to the design/work plan)
  • Sustainability (how will you pay for the program when the grant is gone?)
  • Appendix (everything else, if allowable)

Every once in a while, pull back and evaluate where you are going. This is the deep breath part. A grant writer is always in danger of missing the big picture. You get pulled into the minutiae of budgets and document creation. Remember the mission; you and other stakeholders are solving a problem that you have identified by taking a long dispassionate look at your data.

You can further break down your outline when you approach the narrative portion of the application. It might look like this;

  1. Project Narrative
    1. Goals and Objectives
    2. Proposed Activities
    3. Facilities and Resources (laying the foundation for your budget)
    4. Evaluation (how will you assess whether you met your goals)
    5. Dissemination (how will the public be informed of your project and results)

I'm not trying to muddy the water with more steps. My point is there is no one way to approach the narrative portion of the application. The key is to make sure you are touching on all the important things your grantor needs to know about you, your project and your school. You are setting out from a position of pride. There is a great deal of good stuff going on in your school. You can reveal this by presenting a positive tone in your narrative, but make no mistake, your school has issues, you don't have enough money to solve them in your city budget, and you are appealing to the foundation to join you in a long range relationship to eliminate the problems you've discovered.

In general, foundations and corporations are great partners. They are enthusiastic and want to dig in and help. One of the best ways a local company can help is by providing volunteer support for projects. Get the employees in to your school for after school programs, many of them may have attended your school, it gives them a chance to give back. It also lets them see the problems up close and personal. You don't need to convince when they are right in there with you.

So, create a timeline, when will all of this activity bring valid solutions to your problems? It may be sooner than you think.

Check It Out: New Grant Opportunity!

Program Grants from the Annenberg Foundation. The Foundation generally awards grants in the following programmatic areas: Arts, Culture & Humanities, Animal Welfare, Civic & Community, Environment, Education, and Human Health & Wellness. States: All States, California

Total Amount: $16,000,000.00

Average Amount: $10,000.00 - $250,000.00

Address: 2000 Avenue of the Stars, Ste. 1000, S Los Angeles, CA 90067

Telephone: 213-403-3110

E-mail: requests@annenbergfoundation.org

Website: http://www.annenbergfoundation.org/grantmaking

Eligibility: Public School, Private School, Higher Education, Other

Program Areas: Adult Literacy, After-School, At-Risk/Character, Community Involvement/Volunteerism, Disabilities, Early Childhood, ESL/Bilingual/Foreign Language, Family Services, General Education, Health/PE, Homeless, Library, Math, Reading, Safe/Drug Free Schools, Science/Environmental, Social Studies, Special Education, STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math), Technology

Deadline: Ongoing

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Anthony Robbins Foundation Grants from the Anthony Robbins Foundation. The Anthony Robbins Foundation is a non-profit organization created to empower individuals and organizations to make a significant difference in the quality of life for people often forgotten –youth, homeless and hungry, prisoners, elderly and disabled. To be considered for a grant from the Anthony Robbins Foundation, an organization must submit a Letter of Intent online.

States: All States

Total Amount: $2,000,000.00

Average Amount: $2,500.00 - $15,000.00

Address: 9672 Via Excelencia, Ste. 102, San Diego, CA  92126

Telephone: 858-444-3080

E-mail: Foundation@anthonyrobbinsfoundation.org

Website: http://www.anthonyrobbinsfoundation.org

Eligibility: Public School, Private School, Other

Program Areas: Adult Literacy, After-School, Arts, At-Risk/Character, Community Involvement/Volunteerism, Disabilities, Early Childhood, Family Services, General Education, Health/PE, Homeless, Library, Math, Reading, Safe/Drug Free Schools, Science/Environmental, Social Studies, Special Education, STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math), Technology

Deadline: Ongoing

Working with Stakeholders in a Grant Writing Environment

by Neva Fenno, M.S.Ed., MLIS

You are getting ready to put a narrative description together for your grant application, now you will need to get organized.

Continue to identify your goals, objectives and assessments. What is your project going to do that meets your goals, and how will you know it has (assessment)?

We are not identifying a donor who will provide resources yet. You’re not ready to approach him/her. You’ve got work to do. You may explore the Discount School Supply's Grants Database but you're not ready to make calls to foundations just yet.

You’ll need to learn to make bulleted lists and create an outline. Think about the focus of your project. Answer the following questions; they may help you narrow it down, using the 5 W’s process from journalism:

  • What is the problem you are trying to solve? Why is this project important?
  • Who are you, who will benefit from your project? What are the characteristics of your student and his/her community?
  • Why is this project important to your larger community?
  • When will the project begin? How long will it take to meet your goals? Can you draw a timeline?
  • Where will the project take place? In school, in a community agency, in the student’s home?

“W” number 2, "Who" is the one we're focusing on today. You will also use the 5 W's when you plan to get your stakeholders together. You should be able to answer the question, “Who are the stakeholders I should consult for ideas and guidance as we work through the writing process?" This is not the same thing as writing a grant in a committee. In fact, I don't recommend writing grants in committee, but it is important to identify the people that will be impacted by the project, and getting them together for a focus conversation. The idea that the narrative can be divided up among well-meaning people may sound great, but it's horribly inefficient and you end up with 5 different "voices" and dissimilar ideas of what needs to happen.

Your focus session will be a one-time event; your invitation may say “Please help me approach supporters for funds for our school." Many minds are better than one, you may find some folks who have done this before, and their expertise will be valuable. Or you may find one kindred soul who will keep you on task. There's a fine distinction between working in isolation and writing the grant alone. The former means you have shut out any input that may or may not guide the grant application process. The latter can be taking the opportunity to seek suggestions and then putting it all together in your own narrative.

You will ultimately write it on your own. This is really important advice. This first attempt may be a failure; this is a skill that needs to be nurtured. The work you do now will pay off in dividends later. If you are a successful grant writer, you become a very popular person. You don't want to be accused of shutting anyone out, but you need to set the tone that you are ultimately responsible for the application that is submitted.

Please add comments below, you may have other opinions on this issue, all ideas welcome!

Next time: more about writing narratives.

Check It Out: New Grant Opportunity!

Grant Name:  Captain Planet Foundation Education Grants  Funded by:  The Captain Planet Foundation

Description:  The foundation supports projects that: 1) Promote understanding of environmental issues; 2) Focus on hands-on involvement; 3) Involve children and young adults 6-18 (elementary through high school); 4) Promote interaction and cooperation within the group; 5) Help young people develop planning and problem solving skills; 6) Include adult supervision; 7) Commit to follow-up communication with the foundation (specific requirements are explained once the grant has been awarded).

Program Areas:  Community Involvement/Volunteerism, General Education, Science/Environment, Social Studies, All Other

Recipients:  Public School, Private School, Other

Proposal Deadline:  9/30/13, 1/31/14

Average Amount:  $250.00 - $2,500.00

Contact Person:  Kathy Lively at 404-522-4159

Email:  livelyk@captainplanetfdn.org

Website:  http://www.captainplanetfoundation.org

Availability:  All States

_________________________________________________________________________

Grant Name:  Donald Samull Classroom

Funded by:  Herb Society of America

Description:  Public and/or private 3rd through 6th grade teachers, with classes of a minimum of 15 students may apply for an indoor or an outdoor herb garden grant. The Herb Society of America in cooperation with Prepara® chef's performance tools will award five (5) schools each year with indoor herb growing stations. The classrooms selected will receive four (4) Prepara® Power Plant pro indoor soil-less gardening stations and educational materials to use in the classroom. The Herb Society of America will provide the educational materials. The Herb Society of America will select four (4) schools/classrooms to receive $200 "Seed Money" to establish an outdoor herb garden. The funds may be used for supplies such as soil, plant trays, containers, child or youth sized tools, etc.

Program Areas:  Science/Environmental

Application Form

Proposal Deadline:  October 1, 2013 with awards announced December 1, 2013.

Average Amount:  $200.00

Address:  9019 Kirtland Chardon Rd., Kirtland, OH 44094

Telephone:  440-256-0514

Websitehttp://www.herbsociety.org/resources/samull-grant.html

Availability:  All States

Raising Quick Money

money on a clothes line Anyone who needs and wants grant money for a good academic cause can find it.  How badly do you want the grant money and are you willing to put forth the effort to get it?

A special challenge arises if you need grant money quickly.  What if you came back to school and found that budget cuts have made it impossible for you to be as successful as you have been in the past? Or you know you need curriculum support materials that simply weren't budgeted for.  What if you have a class full of students many of whom simply will not be able to move on to the next grade or pass exams unless you have extra help?

This is not the time to look for big grants that may take thirty days or more to write, even longer to be read and evaluated by a foundation. Next thing you know it's next semester before you have any hope of receiving funds.  Large grant initiatives are the answer to long-term funding problems, but it’s not going to help you if you need it now! Don't berate yourself, all the planning in the world cannot possibly help you predict all emerging needs in your school.

Start with the Discount School Supply® free grant database.  Start looking for foundation or corporate grants that have a deadline coming up soon or even better, no deadline at all.  These grants generally have short applications, many of which can be completed online. The foundation board often meets and decides who gets the money shortly after the deadline is reached.  If your timing is right, you might have grant money in your school account within 45-60 days.  This means you can begin impacting your problem areas before the end of the fall semester. This is especially true if you have an existing relationship with a foundation. Never assume a private foundation will only give you money once. The key is to establish a real working relationship with the people in the foundation who are responsible for making decisions. They'll come back time and again if you're crafty. Invite them in for a tour if you have received funds from them, they love to see how their support is impacting student learning.

When you are looking for a grant, you need to make sure you have a very clearly defined problem.  Next, you need to search the DSS grant database until you find a grant provider that matches your problem.  In fact, you should make absolutely sure that:

1) your problem matches the grant criteria;

2) you fully qualify for the grant (eligibility for public schools for instance);

3) the grant has a deadline within the next 45 days, or no deadline at all.

If you have a problem that can only be addressed by additional help as well as money, you might seek a partnership with a local business. Let them know that their money is important, but you also need volunteers to come during or after school to work with students who are behind.  Sometimes these volunteers are more essential than the money, so if you are going to go after a business partner to help you, make sure they employ the type of person who can most easily make a transition into the role of tutor or classroom helper. It's all about relationships.

Hopefully, you are the kind of person who goes into solution mode when you see a problem that arises for which there is no plan. No time for panic. Other habits to get into are things like book fairs, product box top programs (General Mills) where students save and bring in the box tops that are then mailed in to a processing center for quick cash turnaround. With the right rah-rah attitude and a big glass jar in the school lobby, you'd be surprised how much you can raise. A school store that builds in a little profit for the sale of books, candy, etc. is a great way to teach kids about economics and can raise quite a bit of cash. Candy sales at holiday time, and other fund raising events can provide your school with "mad money" so you'll have it when you need it.

Don’t sit back and wait for someone else to take the lead.  Start looking for those grants and partnerships today.

Check It Out: New Grant Opportunity!

Connecting Mathematics to Other Subject Area Grants from National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM). The purpose of this grant is to create senior high classroom materials or lessons connecting mathematics to other fields. The focus of these materials should be on showing the connectivity of mathematics to other fields or to the world around us. States: All States. Average Amount: $4,000.00 Address: 1906 Association Drive, Reston, VA 20191-1502 Telephone: 800-235-7566 Email: nctm@nctm.org Website: click here Eligibility: Public School, Private School, Other. Program Funded: Math, Professional Development, STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math). Deadline to Apply: 11/1/2013

Foundation Grants from The Michael and Susan Dell Foundation. We seek to fund projects that directly serve or impact children living in urban poverty, particularly in the areas of education, childhood health and family economic stability. Grant planning worksheet

States: All States. Total Amount: $80,000,000.00 Average Amount: $10,000.00 - $500,000.00 Address: PO Box 163867 Austin, TX 78716 Email: info@msdf.org Website: click here Eligibility: Public School, Private School, Higher Education, Other. Program Funded: Adult Literacy, After-School, At-Risk/Character, Community Involvement/Volunteerism, Disabilities, Early Childhood, ESL/Bilingual/Foreign Language, Family Services, General Education, Health/PE, Homeless, Math, Professional Development, Reading, Safe/Drug Free Schools, Social Studies, Special Education. Deadline Comments: Ongoing

Organize Your Approach

by Neva Fenno, M.S.Ed. MLIS money backpack briefcase

You are getting ready to write the grant, you may have a notebook filled with notes from encounters you've had with stakeholders about the direction for your project and your funding priorities.

Now is the time to organize your thoughts in an outline as you develop the structure for your project. Sometimes the foundation will share a winning application with a fledgling applicant. Don’t steal the words, but certainly use it as a template for what you write. Here’s a template I have used for sections to include in the narrative but check the grantor's application guidelines very carefully. Each grant narrative is a unique opportunity to explain your school's priorities and needs.

Organize/structure the proposal.

  • Abstract (consider writing your abstract last; it will allow for more concise, project specific information)
  • Problem Statement or Significance of Project
  • Project Purpose (overall goal and specific objectives)
  • Research Design or work plan (activities and timelines)
  • Applicant qualifications and capabilities
  • Evaluation Plan - assessments
  • Budget (summary and justifications - refer back to the design/work plan)
  • Sustainability (how will you pay for the program when the grant is gone?)
  • Appendix (everything else)

Follow the grantor's instructions for formatting to the letter. A common mistake grant seekers make is to send in an application that has 25 pages when the instructions said not to exceed 15 double spaced pages. The double spaced part is important too – they mean it and will not read one that is single spaced, you’ll have to wait until next year to try again.

If they want the application signed by the superintendent, the principal will not be enough, they want the superintendent, and it proves the district is in support of this effort. Many grant writers venture off on their own to write a grant. They think the end will justify the means, that they will be a hero for taking initiative. Not in this case. Be sure all those in authority in your district are informed about your school's project and the rationale for your grant approach. Work with your principal, she may want to include people in the loop that you might not have thought about.

Many grant seekers make another mistake by running all over town collecting letters of support from various dignitaries. Unless they specifically request 3 letters of support from members of the community, don’t look for those supporters, their letters will annoy the grantor. Toward the end of the process, after many phone calls have been made to the foundation to tighten the narrative, and cross every “t”, a phone call from the superintendent thanking the foundation for giving you the opportunity to apply might be a nice touch.

This is the time you may want to bring your school district business manager into the mix. He or she has done a million budgets; they know what one is supposed to look like. If successful, your grant funds will have an impact on the district's general budget, you want to make sure they know what you're up to. You're also looking for sustainability. Who will pay for your project when the grant ends? You business manager may have some ideas about this important piece of the puzzle.

Use the form the grantor provides for the budget, now is not the time to be creative. There is almost always a separate page called “budget justification”. This is the place where line by line you explain in greater detail how the funds requested will be spent. Don’t estimate, get quotes from suppliers, explain that you have sent three requests out for bid, the prices you are quoting are the lowest of the three. I will go into much more detail about building budgets in future articles, this is a broad brush stroke of the process. The bidding process will require an article all its own for instance.

Foundation and corporate grants generally will not pay for staff. So if you’re putting salaries in the budget, you should have prior approval from the foundation for that expense. Likewise, building projects, if you’re writing a grant for construction of a building, this needs to be pre-approved. Building projects are the single most difficult appeal to make, they are better left to the city budget.

Check It Out: New Grant Opportunities!

Monell Foundation Educational Grants from the Ambrose Monell Foundation. The Foundation gives on a national basis to improve the physical, mental, and moral condition of humanity throughout the world. Giving largely for hospitals and health services, scientific research, museums, performing arts, and other cultural activities, and higher and secondary education; support also for social services, research in political science, mental health, and aid to the handicapped. No grants to individuals. States: All States

Total Amount: $9,000,000.00

Average Amount: $5,000.00-$100,000.00

Address: c/o Fulton, Rowe, & Hart, 1 Rockefeller Plz, Ste. 301, New York, NY 10020-2002

Telephone: 212-245-1863

E-mail: info@monellvetlesen.org

Website: http://www.monellvetlesen.org/

Eligibility: Public School, Private School, Higher Education, Other

Program Area: Adult Literacy, Disabilities, General Education, Health/PE, Math, Reading,  Science/Environmental, Social Studies, STEM (Science, Technology,                                    Engineering, Math)

Deadline: 10/31/2013

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CVS Community Grants for Public Schools from CVS. CVS believes the path to better health starts with wellness prevention. They support programs that build healthy habits and that are designed to help people achieve their best possible health outcomes. These programs can be in a community setting or in a public school.

States: All States

Total Amount: $2,600,000.00

Average Amount: $5,000.00

Telephone: 401-770-8150

E-mail: CommunityMailbox@cvscaremark.com

Website: http://www.cvscaremark.com/community/ways-we-give

Eligibility: Public Schools

Program Area: After School, General Education, Health/PE, Safe/Drug Free Schools

Deadline: 10/31/2013