Intrinsic Motivation, Resourcefulness and Open-Ended Materials

'"Loose parts,'" as mentioned in my blog of May 3, 2013, describes a theory first proposed by Simon Nicholson regarding open-ended materials. These materials suggest no fixed direction other than what is imagined by the children themselves. Nicholson, and others who followed him, proposed that these materials empower our creativity. Focus and concentration are enhanced by combining loose parts with intrinsic motivation, that comes from within the child.

Image
Image

Over a period of several weeks, I observed one five year old's interest in fabric. She began by covering her feet in cloth squares and wrapping them with colored masking tape.

Image
Image

After several sessions of "shoe" making, she chose cardboard from the recycled materials and placed her shoe-covered foot on top. Voila! They became ice skates.

Image
Image

She slid around the room on her ice skates with great pleasure. When she returned for the next session, she chose a large piece of cardboard and began decorating it. Instead of fabric, she cut up strips of available paper and again wrapped her feet.

Image
Image
Image
Image

Having a variety of open-ended materials available allowed her to continue pursuing her passionate ideas. This time she created a snowboard.

Image
Image

Her confidence and satisfaction with her projects grew with the challenges she gave herself.

An article on intrinsic motivation by the National Association of School Psychologists addresses some of the characteristics that develop when children are self-motivated.

  • Persistence: The ability to stay with the task. A highly-motivated child will stay involved for a long period of time. I've observed young children work steadily for 1.5 hours and put their project on a saving shelf for additional work at a later time. They learn persistence when they are successful at a challenging task.
  • Confidence: A developing ability to problem solve is the basis for motivation at this stage of development. Having the self-confidence to know that one can solve a problem motivates the learner to accept other new and challenging situations, which in turn leads to greater learning.
  • Independence: The decreased amount of dependency on adults is another indicator of self- motivation. Children with strong intrinsic motivation do not need an adult constantly watching and helping with activities. Since independence is an important aspect of quality learning, this decreased dependence on adults will greatly enhance children's ability to succeed in school.
  • Positive Emotion: As written in the article, "The last indicator of motivational level is emotion. Children who are clearly motivated will have a positive display of emotion. They are satisfied with their work and show more enjoyment in the activity."

Concentration and focus are greatly enhanced when children are self-motivated. Providing a variety of open-ended materials for creative expression expands intrinsic motivation. For children to discover and explore their interests and passions at an early age informs their course of self-study and choices for a lifetime.