Scaffolding

Instructional scaffolding is a learning process designed to promote a deeper level of learning. It is the support given during the learning process that is tailored to the needs of the student with the intention of helping the student achieve his/her learning goals (Sawyer, 2006).

From Wikipedia:

Scaffolding comes from Lev Vygotsky's concept of an expert assisting a novice, or an apprentice. Though the term was never used by Vygotsky, interactional support and the process by which adults mediate a child's attempts to take on new learning has come to be termed "scaffolding." Scaffolding represents the helpful interactions between adult and child that enable the child to do something beyond his or her independent efforts. A scaffold is a temporary framework that is put up for support and access to meaning and taken away as needed when the child secures control of success with a task.

In expressive arts, where the art-making is child-generated, I use scaffolding with laser precision, though only when appropriate and after I carefully discover what the child has in mind. A combination of knowing the child, the delivery of suggestion, the child's readiness, and timing go into whether the child will allow for the scaffolding.

A 4 year old made a paper bag puppet with sticker eyes and a wonderful jagged-line mouth. As he'd left the body of the bag bare, I asked if he'd like to make clothes for it. He was excited and chose a piece of fabric. The difficulty of cutting the fabric soon became evident.

I asked if he'd prefer to make it from paper, to which he readily agreed. He chose a piece of orange paper and snipped two triangles off the corners. "Oh look, it's underpants." He smiled, recognizing what his cutting had unintentionally created. With that, he carefully cut a long piece of orange masking tape and attached it to the bottom of the bag. He snipped another triangle and called it a hat.

Image
Image

The boy then decided to use a bench as a puppet theater and taped the puppet to the back of the bench. The little spark that occurred as a result of scaffolding grew into a fire of creativity.

Image
Image

Often it is the children themselves who scaffold. When a 3 year old shivered in fright and asked me to put away the larger-than-child-sized Turtle puppet, I first explained what it was made of. (fabric, buttons, shoulder pads, etc.). I wanted her to know that it was not alive, although it seemed to be. Then, I folded Turtle back into his shell and put him away on the rocking chair, telling the puppet, "When the children are no longer afraid, you can come out and play." I used my "Turtle voice" to let the children know that Turtle did hope to become their friend as he'd never, ever hurt them.

"I'm not afraid of you," said one of the children. "I'm going to play with you now. I'll make something for you. Snowflakes!" She went to the shelf where the stuffing was kept and began to tear it into snowball-sized pieces. She put them all in a paper bag and brought it over to the rocking chair.

Image
Image

Showering Turtle with snow caught the attention of other children, who then helped her pile snowballs on top of Turtle.

As they played and laughed, the child who had been scared came closer to the large puppet. She whispered to me that she had made something with arms for him. She wanted me to deliver it on him, while she remained at a distance.

Image
Image

As the other children continued to have fun piling the snow, the girl drew closer and closer. Soon, she, too, was putting snow atop Turtle.

"We love your shell, Turtle. We wish we could get inside with you. Once we didn't like you. We were afraid. But now you are our friend."

Sometimes, an older child can scaffold the next steps with more ease than us adults. An alum visited expressive arts recently. She took a break from puppet making to explore the room. "Turtle," she said softly, upon discovering her old friend. "I used to love Turtle. I'm still like that."

Image
Image
Image
Image

She began to animate the large puppet and interact with the younger children. "Who wants to give me a high five," she said wiggling Turtle's fingers. The 3 year olds, who had previously shown no interest in the large and rather unusual puppet, hesitantly came forward. The older girl continued speaking in her "Turtle voice," and soon those with finished puppets came forward and began playing with Turtle.

Image
Image

Later, as she was leaving with a box full of her work, she said with all the wisdom of her 10 years, "I have the brain of a kid and the mind of an artist. Without art, my life is dull."

Product Recommendations from Discount School Supply®:

Make Your Own Animal Puppets - Kit for 12

Colorations® Eye Stickers - 2000 Pieces

9" x 12" Colorations® Heavyweight Construction Paper

1/2" Colored Masking Tape - Set of 10